Posts Tagged ‘orange’

Orange Amplification Announces DIVO VT1000 Valve Tester

Thursday, January 31st, 2013

Orange Amplification has released the DIVO  VT1000 Valve Tester, an automatic valve tester that performs a host of diagnostics on both preamp and power amp tubes. The unit has one octal and two nine pin valve sockets to fit pe-amp and EL34 valves. Once inserted, the user presses the start button and the tests are run.

Vt1000 valve tester

VT1000 Details:

Tests run:

  • Heater filament test: Short circuit
  • Heater filament test: Open circuit
  • Heater filament test: Tolerance check
  • Heater cathode insulation: Leakage
  • Heater cathode insulation: Short Circuit
  • Tests for heater current abnormalities
  • Amplification factor
  • Voltage gain
  • Power gain
  • Screen grid test
  • Mutual conductance test
  • Dual test for double triodes
  • Emission
  • Inter electrode leakage
  • Inter electrode short circuit
  • Flash-over (arc detection, high voltage breakdown)
  • Gas ionisation test

Compatible Valves:

  • EL34/6CA7
  • EL34L
  • 6L6
  • 6V6/6v6GTA
  • KT66
  • KT77
  • KT88
  • 6550
  • 5881
  • EL84/6BQ5
  • ECC81/12AT7
  • ECC82/12AU7
  • ECC83/12AX7
  • ECC99
  • 12BH7

Marshall JVM210 100W & 50W With TubeSync DIVO OV4 Installed

Friday, July 13th, 2012

What is my opinion about the TubeSync Divo OV4? (Charlotte Mijnders – http://www.charlottemijnders.nl )

Well, it has improved my sound, it is much tighter than before, on both the amps it looks like the tubes are matched much better and are pushed to their best performance.

The overall sound is more defined, tighter, more dynamic to my opinion.

On my Jvm210 I have 2 El34’s and 2 6550’s , I can switch between them and they sound as mentioned above, but the best thing is combining all the tubes together, that makes a great sound, more tight bass and bass/mid response of the 6550,and beautiful mids and mid/highs of the El34 on top of it, I like it!.

That is a great option of the Divo, that you can combine tubes in this way.

Pictures

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TubeSync Fitted To A Mesa Boogie F-50

Thursday, June 9th, 2011

Sensational blues guitarist Mitch Laddie has been out touring with the product fitted to his Mesa/Boogie F-50, which he said sounds “incredible”. “I had totally fallen out of love with this particular amp before Tubesync was fitted but the difference in sound is more than substantial.The response and tone have been improved ten-fold. Very tight, very fat and all round punchier, especially in the low to mid frequencies.”

Mitch & His Mesa F50“I believe the product is very interesting and definitely nothing like anything I’ve seen or used before. The main advantages of the product are that not only does it give you a valve maintenance feature by displaying a light if a fault is found within a valve, but it manages your valves to run at an equal number of milliamps. This means that each valve is working at an equal rate which in theory gives you optimum amp performance.

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Above : TubeSync fitted to a Mesa Boogie F-50

Doug Doppler Demos Orange Amps Rockerverb 100 with DIVO Frankfurt Musikmesse 2011

Wednesday, April 13th, 2011

Doug Doppler Demos Orange Amps Rockerverb 100 with DIVO Musikmesse 2011

Orange Amps Rockerverb 100 with DIVO Musikmesse 2011 / Doug Doppler

Orange Amps Rockerverb 100 with DIVO Musikmesse 2011 / Doug Doppler

TubeSync DIVO A Brilliant Idea From The UK That Could Be The Way Of The Future For Valve Amp Design

Friday, April 1st, 2011

Checkout the TubeSync DIVO review in the April 2011 Guitarist Magazine.

”TubeSync DIVO works perfectly and does an excellent job of keeping even the most wayward valves on the straight and narrow. If you want to get the absolute best out of your amp and improve its reliability, DIVO is almost an essential – it’s a real innovation”.

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Jamming With The New Orange Rockerverb MKII with TubeSync DIVO

Saturday, March 12th, 2011

Mitch Laddie and Michael Blackwell checkout the new Orange Rockerverb 100 head with DIVO. The verdict was 10 out of 10!

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Tube Amp Testing For Professional Stage Performers – Engineering Tube Talk

Tuesday, February 22nd, 2011

A common requirement for tube amplifiers used for professional and stage purposes is that there should be a high percentage of confidence that one or more tubes will not fail during the performance. Tubes are often thought of in the same manner as light bulbs, in that they are most likely to fail catastrophically at switch on. This means that the moments just after the switch on point constitute the most stressful and potentially damaging periods in the life of the equipment.

In an attempt to guard against this possibility, it is common practice to do one of two things on a regular basis.

1/ regularly remove the tubes and have them commercially tested;

2/ replace the tubes with new stock on a regular basis.

These two methods may give the operator a degree of confidence but in fact, it can be shown that the faith placed in both methods is misplaced.

It is a known fact that removal of a tube from its socket results in a number of potentially damaging mechanical stresses on the metal to glass seals around the pins. Each insertion of an all glass tube will cause micro-cracking of the glass around the pin. This will invariably cause a small leakage of air into the valve, causing ‘gassing’ and eventually leading to its demise.

Removal for testing will also break the intimate contact between the holder and the tube contact pin, resulting in a poorer contact on re-insertion.

Many tube testers apply unreasonable electrical stresses to the tube internal electrodes and it is not uncommon for a known good valve to be damaged during the test. Tube testers can also give erroneous results depending on the way they perform the tests, possibly allowing faulty tubes to show ‘good’ and the good valves to be rejected as ‘bad’.

The second method of ‘blanket replacement’ with new stock on a regular basis can also lead to problems because if the failure distribution curve for tubes is analysed, it can be seen to follow the classic ‘bathtub’ failure curve. This inevitably means that an amplifier which is regularly ‘re-tubes’ will inevitably be considerably more likely to fail during the first hundred hours service than one which has been left untouched.

TubeSync overcomes these problems by performing an ‘in circuit’ test on the tubes every time the amplifier is powered up. The mutual conductance (gm) of the tube is measured by monitoring the cathode current of each valve whilst adjusting the grid bias in fixed steps. The results are tabulated and the new value is compared with previously stored values. A decision is then made on how far the tube has decayed in emission since the last test. Outputs from the device inform the user of the predicted remaining life of the tube.

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TubeSync Facebook Friends Are Now 2,000+

Wednesday, February 16th, 2011

Due to the growing demand TubeSync has now over 2,000 friends on Facebook!

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Click on the link above if you would like to join the TubeSync Revolution

Guitar Amp Users – Get TubeSync Fitted!

Wednesday, September 8th, 2010

With TubeSync fitted in your amp there is no need to match output tubes. Drop in any combination of makes OR EVEN TYPES!!! (EL34, KT77, KT88, 6L6 etc) and TubeSync will automatically sense and adjust the output bias of each tube independently to balance the amp. Imagine what new tones you can create from those limitless output tube combinations! You can even run a 2 X EL34s and 2 X 6L6s in your 100W head simultaneously, alternately you can use the half power mode and switch between  6L6s or EL34s at 50W output power, now that’s cool!Rock Star

Read on to find out how you can get TubeSync fitted into your amp

TubeSync can only be installed by accredited engineers via ‘TubeSync Service Points’. To find the nearest TubeSync Service Point near you, please click on the image blow

TubeSync Service Point

Leaky Tubes / Valves Can Blow the HT Fuse In Guitar Amps, TubeSync Can Avoid This!

Thursday, July 1st, 2010

An interesting phenomenon that some ‘leaky’ tubes, removed from conventionally biased amps, appear to improve when run with TubeSync. The reason may be that when the tube gets hot, g1/cathode leak causes a current increase, but it is automatically biased ‘back’ to compensate, which allows the tube to cool down again and thus reduce leakage et al. After a while the leak sometimes reduces or disappears completely – we surmise that the getter  gets a chance to mop up stray gas molecules or the metallic deposit gets ‘boiled off’ the mica supports.  This type of fault in a conventional amp would normally blow the HT fuse, however TubeSync can avoid is and rectify the problem! Cool eh?

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